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Movie title reads, "Chickenpox, with Annie and Moby."

A young girl, Annie, is sitting at a classroom table. She is looking at a get well card. There are four cats on the card. They have thermometers in their mouths. Text on the card reads: To Becca, Hope you feel purrrrrfect soon.

Annie's robot friend, Moby, walks up to her.

ANNIE: Did you sign Becca's get well card?

MOBY: Beep?

ANNIE: She's been out sick with the chickenpox.

MOBY: Beep.

Moby thinks about a chicken sitting on a nest and clucking.

ANNIE: No, Moby, you don't get chickenpox from chickens. What is chickenpox?

Annie's notebook reads: What is chickenpox?

ANNIE: A virus is a type of germ that can spread inside living things and cause illnesses.

Text reads, virus: a type of germ that can spread inside living things and cause illnesses.

ANNIE: Colds and flu are caused by viruses.

An animation shows a young boy sit up in his bed. He sneezes into a tissue.

ANNIE: Chickenpox is caused by a virus, too.

MOBY: Beep?

ANNIE: The chickenpox virus enters the body and starts growing and spreading.

An animation shows chickenpox viruses invading a body as Annie speaks.

ANNIE: Your immune system works hard to protect the body and fights off the virus.

An animation shows an immune system chasing off two chickenpox viruses.

ANNIE: But while that's happening, you can feel sick. What happens when you have chickenpox?

Annie's notebook reads: What happens when you have chickenpox?

ANNIE: A symptom is a change in the body caused by an illness.

Text reads, symptom: a change in the body caused by an illness.

ANNIE: When you first get chickenpox, you might have symptoms like a runny nose or a fever.

Animations show a young girl sneezing into a tissue and then taking her own temperature with a thermometer.

ANNIE: You might be tired, and you might not feel like eating.

An animation shows the same girl sitting at a table. She picks up her lunch but she is too tired to eat.

ANNIE: It feels like you have a cold. Soon you get small, red spots on your chest and face, which can spread to other parts of your body. The spots look like blisters, and they can be really itchy.

The same girl is shown sleeping in her bed. She has red, puffy spots all over her skin.

ANNIE: Some people get just a few spots, but others get them all over, even inside their ears and mouth.

Images show a young boy with a few spots on his face, and a young girl covered with red spots on her face and arms.

ANNIE: Even though the spots are itchy, do not scratch them. Scratching can tear your skin and let germs come in.

An animation shows the girl scratching the spots on her arm. A large red "X" appears over her. There is a loud buzz.

ANNIE: A doctor or a grown-up can help with the itchiness to make you feel more comfortable. You might get a special lotion, ointment, or medicine that can help make you feel more comfortable. You might take a bath in some oatmeal or baking soda to help calm your itchy spots.

Images show pills, lotions, medicines, and boxes of oatmeal and baking soda.

ANNIE: It's important to get plenty of rest so your body can fight off the virus.

An animation shows the girl with spots resting in her bed. She is reading, and her cat is sleeping next to her.

ANNIE: After a week or so, you start feeling much better, and the spots heal and go away.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: You're right, Moby. There are a few kids at school who've gotten chickenpox, including me! How can you help keep chickenpox from spreading?

Annie's notebook reads: How can you help keep chickenpox from spreading?

ANNIE: Chickenpox is contagious, which means it can spread from one person to another. Someone can spread the virus by coughing or sneezing, just like a cold.

An animation shows a teacher and her students in a classroom. A young girl coughs into her arm. Then she sneezes into a tissue.

ANNIE: The spots don't show up until a little later, so someone can spread chickenpox without even knowing it.

Other students in the classroom begin to cough.

ANNIE: You can stop the spread of germs by covering your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough.

A student coughs and covers his mouth. Another student sneezes into a tissue.

ANNIE: Be sure to wash your hands to help prevent, or stop, the spread of germs.

Annie washes her hands in the classroom sink. She uses warm water and soap.

MOBY: Beep.

Moby gives a thumbs up.

ANNIE: A vaccine is a shot that can keep you from getting sick in the future.

Text reads, vaccine: a shot that can keep you from getting sick in the future.

ANNIE: Many kids get vaccines to prevent getting chickenpox. So fewer people get chickenpox now.

An image shows a mother bringing her daughter to the doctor for a vaccination.

ANNIE: But, some kids can still catch it, and that's O.K. Don't feel scared. When I got chickenpox, I was uncomfortable, but I felt better in no time!

Annie is sleeping in her bed. There are red spots on her face. She is holding a teddy bear.

ANNIE: The good news is that once you get the virus, you probably won't ever get it again! I think Becca will be back in class soon. I'm going to send her favorite book along with the card.

Annie holds up the book "All About Leatherbacks." The cover has a picture of a baby turtle hatching from an egg.

MOBY: Beep.

Moby is holding a chicken. The chicken is clucking.

ANNIE: You're going to send her a chicken?

MOBY: Beep.

Moby shakes his head "no." Annie looks around. The classroom is filled with chickens. They are clucking loudly.

ANNIE: Oh, you're going to send her a lot of chickens?

MOBY: Beep.

Moby cracks an egg on his head. It begins to fry.

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