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Movie title reads, "Digestive System, with Annie and Moby."

Annie, a young girl, and her robot friend, Moby, are in a school cafeteria. They are sitting at a table. Annie has her lunch in a small paper bag. Moby has a huge pile of food in front of him.

ANNIE: You're going to eat that all by yourself?

MOBY: Beep.

Moby nods. Then he begins putting a massive amount of food in his mouth.

ANNIE: But...you're going to get a stomachache.

MOBY: Beep.

Moby has eaten all of his food.

ANNIE: Your body's digestive system is in charge of breaking down food and taking in nutrients. What happens when you eat?

Annie's notebook reads: What happens when you eat?

ANNIE: When you chew, your teeth help break down food into smaller pieces. Your tongue pushes food around to help you eat.

Three children sit at a cafeteria table, eating their food, as Annie explains things.

ANNIE: The saliva, or spit inside your mouth, helps break down food so it's easier to swallow.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: When you swallow, food goes into your throat and moves down the esophagus. The esophagus is like a stretchy pipe that connects to your stomach.

An animation of the digestive system illustrates what Annie describes.

ANNIE: What does the stomach do?

Annie's notebook reads: What does the stomach do?

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: Right, Moby. Your stomach is kind of like a sack that stores food.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: The stomach mixes and mashes food down even more. Gastric juices break down food into a soupy mix.

An animation of the stomach illustrates what Annie describes.

ANNIE: Sometimes you can feel your stomach churn and do its job.

MOBY: Beep.

Moby holds his stomach.

ANNIE: What happens when food leaves the stomach?

Annie's notebook reads: What happens when food leaves the stomach?

ANNIE: Food moves from the stomach into the small intestine.

An animation of the small intestine illustrates what Annie describes.

ANNIE: Your small intestine isn't very small. It's a really, really long tube. The small intestine breaks food down even more so your body can absorb, or take in, nutrients from the food.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: Well, some foods like milk, cheese, and dark greens are high in calcium, which is a mineral your body uses to build strong bones.

Milk, cheese, and vegetables appear next to a human skeleton.

ANNIE: Meat, nuts, and tofu are foods that are high in protein, which your body uses to build muscles.

Chicken, fish, and the other foods Annie describes appear next to an animation of muscles in motion.

ANNIE: Organs send juices to the small intestines to help your body digest food and absorb different nutrients.

An animation shows the different organs that Annie describes.

ANNIE: Food might stay in your small intestines for hours.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: What happens when food leaves the small intestine?

Annie's notebook reads: What happens when food leaves the small intestine?

ANNIE: The stuff your small intestine did not absorb moves to the large intestine.

An animation shows the small and large intestines.

ANNIE: It's shorter than the small intestine, but it's fatter.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: Right, Moby. The large intestine is also called the colon.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: In the colon, your body absorbs water that's left and leaves waste behind.

An animation shows waste sitting in the colon.

ANNIE: Later, you get rid of the waste.

Doors to school restrooms are labeled "boys" and "girls." There is the sound of a toilet flushing.

ANNIE: The mouth, esophagus, stomach, intestines, and other parts of the body that break down food and take in nutrients make up the digestive system.

Text reads, digestive system: the mouth, esophagus, stomach, intestines, and other parts of the body that break down food and take in nutrients.

ANNIE: How can you care for the digestive system?

Annie's notebook reads: How can you care for the digestive system?

ANNIE: It's important to eat nutritious foods that your body can use to grow strong and healthy.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: Foods that are high in fiber, such as whole grains, beans, nuts, fruits, and vegetables are good for your digestive system.

Images show the foods that Annie describes.

ANNIE: Your body uses water to make gastric juices that help you digest food.

Annie drinks water from the fountain between the two restrooms.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: So, it's a good idea to drink water when you're thirsty, instead of sugary sodas.

A large "X" appears over images of different kinds of sodas. There is a loud buzz.

ANNIE: Exercise is also good for your digestive system. It helps keep things moving through your body.

An animation shows people in a park walking, jumping rope, and riding bicycles.

ANNIE: The digestive system begins with your mouth, so it's important to eat slowly and chew your food.

Moby sits at the cafeteria table. He is eating a lot of food very quickly.

MOBY: Beep.

ANNIE: It's also important to eat the right amount of food. If you eat too fast or eat too much, you might get a stomachache.

MOBY: Beep.

Moby stands. His stomach sounds like some springs inside it have broken. He wiggles back and forth.

ANNIE: Uh-oh, Moby.

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